Leaving Adam’s Peak, Best Breakfast in Dalhousie & How to get to Hatton

On our way down from Adam’s Peak we were seduced by aromas from the breakfast delights that the stalls and tea huts were cooking up. We didn’t want to stop and eat though, as we were desperate for a shower and now that it was well after sunrise, the day was getting hotter by the second.

The Best Breakfast in Dalhousie

Breakfast wasn’t included in our room rate at our hotel in Dalhousie so we decided to pick up some bits at the bottom of the peak. We waited until we reached the village so that we didn’t have to carry the food far.

We ended up in the big restaurant right next to our hotel, but we wanted the food to take away.

“No problem,” said the chef/owner/waiter. “What do you want?”

I ordered all manner of rotis, samosas and parathas to take back up to our balcony from where we could munch happily and watch the town come to life. My stomach was rumbling at the thought as I waited for our food.

leaving-adams-peak-best-breakfast-in-dalhousie-how-to-get-to-hatton

Breakfast on our balcony with the now fog-covered Adam’s Peak in the background

Everything was cooked fresh and shoved into tiny plastic bags.

“You want dhal curry?” asked the guy.

Of course I wanted dhal curry! That too was scooped into a plastic bag which was then tied in a knot. That was a first: curry in a bag. Squishy!

Back on our hotel balcony we dived into our feast once we’d showered and changed. Everything was amazing. We wolfed it down and got ourselves caked in goo and dhal curry. Totally yummy. We stank for the rest of the day.

Getting from Dalhousie to Hatton in time to take the train

I had read really weird things about the buses going back down from Dalhousie to Hatton. Things that made me wonder if we would have to fork out for a tuk tuk…

I had read that there were only two buses from Dalhousie to Hatton each morning and that the last one was at 9.30am and that if you missed it you would miss the train from Hatton to Haputale/Ella.

This didn’t add up at all to us as buses are so FREQUENT in Sri Lanka. This just didn’t seem right. Plus, the previous day we had seen buses up and down the hill to and from Dalhousie all afternoon.

Of course, the lack of information available made it into a guessing game. But we were used to that by now in Sri Lanka.

We decided to take our time coming down from Adam’s Peak, take our time over breakfast and then see what the situation was.

The situation was that there were plenty of buses and when we were ready to leave, we just went to the main square, climbed aboard and prepared for the death-ride back down to Hatton.

So if you are planning on going by train towards Haputale/Ella after Adam’s Peak, DON’T WORRY about the frequency of the buses between Dalhousie and Hatton!

What Happens Next?

We took the bus from Dalhousie to Hatton at 11.30am. We were in plenty of time to queue up and get our train tickets for the 13.26 train to Haputale.

Remember: don’t get off the bus at the BUS station in Hatton, get off at the TRAIN station.

Obviously if you want to take the train from Hatton at 11am then you need to take a much earlier bus down from Dalhousie. But I think the way we did it was great because the last thing we wanted was to rush Adam’s Peak.

Now we had the next part of our journey to look forward to: one of the classic train journeys through the hill country…

Read about it here.

I have written this post to try to provide a bit of information to other travellers doing a similar route around Sri Lanka, because I know how frustrating the lack of practical information is. If you have found this or any of my other Sri Lanka posts useful, please let me know!

Filed Under: asiafeaturedfood and drinkSri LankaSri Lanka Hill Country

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About the Author: Lisa, born and grew up in England, live in Mallorca, Spain... Have visited more than 20 countries, have twice as many to yet visit, love sharing experiences....

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